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The brewery has valves in many applications; what are some common types used?

The following valves arecommonly used in breweries: 1. Butterfly valves are relativelyinexpensive and sanitary valves, mainly suitable for on-off operation. Thedesign of the butterfly valve fea­tures a disk that pivots on a center axis andis sealed with a replaceable valve seat of an appropriate electrometricmaterial. This design allows for the complete cleaning of all product contactsurfaces in a CIP operation when fully opened. Valves of this type are notrecommended for incre­mental flow control, because they generate high shear inthe product. Butterfly valves can be specified with lockout features .  2. Ball valves contain a rotating ball with a holeformed through the center to control flow. They are especially prevalent in gasdistribution and water-piping applications. They are not considered sanitary indesign for product use; salespersons claiming them as such should be ques­tioned.These valves are generally inexpensive, long lived, and suitable forhigh-pressure applications. They are very good for on-off functions but not forregulating flow.  3. Globe valves are excellent atcontrolling flow. Operationally, a sealing disk controls the restriction of theflow path. Globe valves are often found in steam and water applications and aregenerally non-sanitary in design.  4. Solenoid valves are on-off valves thatare actuated by energizing a small electromagnetic coil. When activated, thecoil allows a diaphragm to move, thus permitting fluid flow. They are oftenused for glycol control and small pneumatic control duties.  5. Diaphragmvalves areused for sanitary, manual flow control, As a flexible diaphragm israised, increasing flow is permitted.  6. Angle-seatvalves arestructurally similar to globe valves but are pneumatically actuated for on-offoperation. They are used in kegging equipment and for similar applications.  All the pictures above are the valves on our brewhouse, sourced from reputed valve facilities which will be guaranteed on quality.

What're angle-seat valves?

Angle-seat valves are structurally similar to globe valves but are pneumatically actuated for on-off operation. They are used in kegging equipment and for similar applications.

What're diaphragm valves?

Diaphragm valves are used for sanitary, manual flow control, As a flexible diaphragm is raised, increasing flow is permitted. 

What're solenoid valves?

Solenoid valves are on-off valves that are actuated by energizing a small electromagnetic coil.When activated, the coil allows a diaphragm to move, thus permitting fluid flow. They are often used for glycol control and small pneumatic control duties.

What're globe valves?

Globe valves are excellent at controlling flow. Operationally, a sealing disk controls the restriction of the flow path. Globe valves are often found in steam and water applications and are generally non-sanitary in design.

What're ball valves?

Ball valves contain a rotating ball with a hole formed through the center to control flow. They are especially prevalent in gas distribution and water-piping applications. They are not considered sanitary in design for product use; salespersons claiming them as such should be questioned. These valves are generally inexpensive, long lived, and suitable for high-pressure applications. They are very good for on-off functions but not for regulating flow.

What're butterfly valves?

Butterfly valves are relatively inexpensive and sanitary valves, mainly suitable for on-off operation. The design of the butterfly valve features a disk that pivots on a center axis and is sealed with a replaceable valve seat of an appropriate electrometric material. This design allows for the complete cleaning of all product contact surfaces in a CIP operation when fully opened. Valves of this type are not recommended for incre¬mental flow control, because they generate high shear in the product. Butterfly valves can be specified with lockout features.

The soul of the craft beer--hops

The hop (Humuluslupulus L.) is a perennial, dioecious climbing plant of the hemp family and belongs to the order (Urticales) which alsoincludes the nettle family. In the brewery it is the inflorescences of the female plant which are used. These contain bitter resins and etherealoils which supply bittering and aroma components to the beer. As far as brewing is concerned, hops are thedried hop cones of the female hop plant and products made from them which contain only components from hops. Hops are grown- in special growing regions where the necessary growth conditions exist. After the harvesting of the hop, they are driedand processed to avoid a reduction in their value. The structure of the hop cone and its composition provide important information for theevaluation of hops.

Adjuncts for beer production--wheat

Wheat is rarely used as un-malted adjunct but is often used in a malted form, e.g. for production of top fermented beers, such as various types of wheat beer. The percentage of wheat malt used to produce wheat beers is usually 50 to 60% because of its high extract yield. Since only a very small part of the wheat crop is used for brewing wheat variety.  To further improve the quality of wheat beer, great efforts have been made to cultivate brewing wheat strains. Winter varieties are preferable because of their lower protein content and higher extract content. In addition they give a paler beer.

How important of barley to beer?

Barley is the main raw material for beer production. Its use depends on the fact that barley has a high starch content and the husk still adheres to the grain, even after threshing and processing to malt. Consequently it is able to from the wort filtration layer required in a later production stage. Before use in the brewery the barley must first be converted into malt.Barley (Hordeumvulgare) supplies the starch required for beer production. This starch is converted to fermentable extract in the brewhouse. It is necessary to produce, by cultivation of suitable varieties,barleys which provide extract rich malts.

How important of water to beer

Water: Beer is composed mostly of water. Regions have water with different mineral components; as a result, different regions were originally better suited to making certain types of beer, thus giving them a regional character. For example, Dublin has hard water well suited to making stout, such as Guinness; while Pilsen has soft water well suited to making pale lager, such as Pilsner Urquell.The waters of Burton in England contain gypsum, which benefits making pale ale to such a degree that brewers of pale ales will add gypsum to the local water in a process known as Burtonisation.

What's the starch?

The starch source in a beer provides the fermentable material and is a key determinant of the strength and flavour of the beer. The most common starch source used in beer is malted grain. Grain is malted by soaking it in water, allowing it to begin germination, and then drying the partially germinated grain in a kiln. Malting grain produces enzymes that will allow conversion from starches in the grain into fermentable sugars during the mash process.Different roasting times and temperatures are used to produce different colours of malt from the same grain. Darker malts will produce darker beers.

What's the malting?

Malting is the process where barley grain is made ready for brewing.Malting is broken down into three steps in order to help to release the starches in the barley.First, during steeping, the grain is added to a vat with water and allowed to soak for approximately 40 hours. During germination, the grain is spread out on the floor of the germination room for around 5 days.The final part of malting is kilning when the malt goes through a very high temperature drying in a kiln; with gradual temperature increase over several hours.

What's the mashing?

Mashing is the process of combining a mix of milled grain (typically malted barley with supplementary grains such as corn, sorghum, rye or wheat), known as the grain bill, and water, known as liquor, and heating this mixture in a vessel called a mash tun. Mashing is a form of steeping, and defines the act of brewing, such as with making tea, sake, and soy sauce. Technically, wine, cider and mead are not brewed but rather vinified, as there is no steeping process involving solids. Mashing allows the enzymes in the malt to break down the starch in the grain into sugars, typically maltose to create a malty liquid called wort. There are two main methods – infusion mashing, in which the grains are heated in one vessel; and decoction mashing, in which a proportion of the grains are boiled and then returned to the mash, raising the temperature. Mashing involves pauses at certain temperatures (notably 45–62–73 °C or 113–144–163 °F), and takes place in a mash tun– an insulated brewing vessel with a false bottom. The end product of mashing is called a “mash”. Mashing usually takes 1 to 2 hours, and during this time the various temperature rests activate different enzymes depending upon the type of malt being used, its modification level, and the intention of the brewer.